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July 03, 2005

Marketing Masterpiece Theatre

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Enjoy the inaugural episode | Marketing Masterpiece Theatre (mp3) [5:00 min, 3.4MB]

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Ha! Had to laugh at "Playbull." If there's anyone in the world that's overprotective of their brand name it's Playbill. We had a show (client) once called "My Big Gay Italian Wedding" and made the programs look like Playbills but called it "Gaybill." They put a cease and desist order on us in a big hurry. Also, Forbidden Broadway is managed by a company called "Playkill," which is appropriate if you know anything about the show; it parodies big Broadway shows that need to be taken down a notch or two. Thanks for Marketing Masterpiece Theatre...the content is every bit as good as the title is funny.

Uh-oh. BA has a copy of my book.

I'm in big f******g trouble...

Egads. I didn't mean to disrespect Fox's EXCELLENT chapter on not using personal pronouns instead of a company/brand name in marketing copy. It's spot-on in my book. Maybe this is a case where my goofiness gets in the way of a dang good message.

I was half-kidding. Atlhough I did do some copywriting/advertising for a company where the corporate first-person worked -- although as a rule I agree that it doesn't.

And regarding interpretive reading -- it's a sore subject with me because there's been talk of a talking book made from mine, and I'm insisting that I do it -- although I don't want a talking book. I'm probably wrong. There should be one.

Maybe they'll hire you. Can you do Mickey Mouse or Donald Duck? (I know you can do Goofy...)

Your use of the term "Masterpiece Theater" isn't that a potential copyright infringement?

Jeremy, does my Masterpiece Theatre interpretation meet the legal standard for parody?

Parody allows you to make fun of a copyright or in this case, the trademark. It all depends on the confusion factor for readers balanced by the public interest in free speech. In this case, I doubt that your reading - although quite brilliant - would lead to any confusion.
*Please do not take the above as any type of legal opinion or advice of counsel. Thanks - J

A good angle on podcasting for business subjects.

I laughed, I cried, I changed the copy on my website!

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