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March 24, 2004

Competing for Share of Consciousness

While on vacation in Seattle, I’m taking time to catch up on some reading and some thinking. Currently, I’m chewing on the paradoxical wisdom written by Watts Wacker and Jim Taylor in The Visionary’s Handbook. (Admittedly, I am a laggard in reading this book as it was first published in 2000. I really hate being a laggard!)

In one chapter, the authors talk about competing for "Share of Consciousness" with consumers.

To win consciousness share, the message has to tie to the product to the experiences of the consumers you want to reach, so it can enter the full dimensionality of their lives. The message can’t just celebrate the product – products are everywhere.

You can also create consciousness share by never forgetting that all great consumers – the ones who set markets and launch new product lines – are acutely aware of themselves as markets of one. Fail to win a share of their attention by being innovative at the same time you are pursuing a share of the larger market consciousness, and you’ll be sacrificing the future for the present.

The largest percentage of the market you are ever going to attract occurs at the very moment you begin to lose the customer who made it happen.

All marketers working for companies that are in full throttle growth mode should re-read and "chew" on this statement again: The largest percentage of the market you are ever going to attract occurs at the very moment you begin to lose the customer who made it happen.

WHOA!!! That is a “chewy” statement.

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Comments

Interesting. Can't say I disagree at all, especially the appreciation of the dimensionality of feeling--a major obstacle that prevents "credentialed" business thinkers from recognizing their consumers and the intrinsic power in the brands and products they make.

This one slipped by me too. thanks.

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